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The City of Holyoke is a leader in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts on matters of energy conservation and renewable energy generation.

Holyoke was built on renewable energy and has embraced its roots by doing all that it can to create a sustainable community of the future. The city’s quest to become a Green Community stemmed from understanding the need to continue to make improvements, upgrades, and efficiencies in order to work toward a completely sustainable community with reduced energy consumption and carbon-free energy generation.

As one of the first planned industrial cities in America, Holyoke was built on water power with a hydroelectric facility placed at the location of a 57-foot drop in the Connecticut River, with 4.5 miles and three levels of canals to fully maximize the power of the river. This resource provided Holyoke with the power to become the “Paper City” and at one time among the wealthiest cities in the world.  Holyoke is now embracing the challenge to return to its roots to promote the city’s “green” sustainable features. Holyoke’s municipal utility has worked hard to achieve 80 percent of its retail electricity generation through carbon-free sources and continues to work on adding renewable sources and reducing consumption.

Holyoke has been a Green Community since 2010 and has received the following funds from the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources:

  • $321,221 for the conversion of exterior parking lot lighting to LEDs at all twelve schools, for high-efficiency, LED traffic and street lights, and to purchase BigBelly Solar Compactors for public parks and high traffic areas.

  • $166,716 to fund Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning system upgrades in the Exhibit Hall in the Children’s Museum including replacing the boilers with high-efficiency gas boilers, replacing the rooftop air conditioning units, installing direct digital controls and demand control ventilation.

  • $230,000 to fund energy conservation measures in City Hall and City Hall Annex.
  • $115,895 to fund the following energy conservation measures: interior and/or exterior LED lighting conversions at two schools and six facilities

These plans are guided by the City’s Energy Reduction Plan, which can be downloaded here:

Holyoke Energy Reduction Plan May 14 2010

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