Board of Health

Public Health Affects Us All.

The mission of the Holyoke Health Department is to enhance public health and safeguard the environment by assessing community needs and to provide prevention, protection, and educational resources to ensure the highest quality of life within the City of Holyoke.

The goal of this department is to improve the quality of life by encouraging healthy behaviors, promote wellness, educate, monitor, and to protect healthy environments in homes, schools, and workplaces. 

Professional Services

Under State Statute, the Board of Health is responsible for permitting and inspecting businesses that provide services to the public that include:

Food Establishments Permitting and Inspections, and other Food Handling Issues such as:

  • Bakery
  • Bottled Water
  • Catering
  • Food Complaints
  • Frozen Dessert
  • Mobile Food
  • Retail Food
  • Temporary Food
  • Tobacco
  • Tanning Establishments
  • Wells
  • Vacant Property
  • Burial Permits
  • Recreational Camps
  • Manicuring Establishments
  • Hotels/Motels
  • Public Swimming Pools
  • Ice Skating Rinks
  • Body Art Technicians & Establishments
  • Witnessing Title V Inspections
  • Plan Reviews for Septic Systems, Subdivisions, and Well Construction
  • Investigation of Foodborne & Waterborne Illness
  • Housing Inspections for Compliance
Deborah Schaier - Public Nurse

413-322-5598

schaierd@holyoke.org

Ernest Mathieu - Chief Sanitarian

mathieue@holyoke.org

John Wierciszewski - Senior Code Enforcement Inspector

wierciszewskij@holyoke.org

Juana Massa - Enforcement Inspector

massaj@holyoke.org

Beatriz Colon - Board of Health Head Clerk

colonb@holyoke.org

Erick Velez - Animal Control Officer

veleze@holyoke.org

Sean Gonsalves - Sanitarian

gonsalvess@holyoke.org

Suzanne Beyer - Principal Clerk

beyers@holyoke.org

No posts found.

The Health Commission oversees and insures the enforcement of all State laws, regulations, and City Ordinances relating to public and environmental health. They also oversee various programs of Community Health and Environmental Services, and Health Education in order to protect  public health and improve the quality of life in the community. 

 

Current Members:

 

Dalila Hyry-Dermith Clerk- term expires Feb. 1, 2019

Patricia Mertes APRN, Chair – term expires Feb. 1, 2017

Dr. Robert Mausel, Vice Chair – term expires Feb. 1, 2018

What do I need a permit for? What does it cost? Do I need to apply first?

Below we will help to answer your questions. Listed are the permits issued by the City of Holyoke Board of Health. To download the applications, simple click on the link. The list also outlines expiration dates and the annual fees associated with each permit. If you have any questions, please give us a call and we will be happy to help.

NOTE: All temporary applications and fees require that all applications, paperwork and fees must be in the office three business days (72 hours) prior to the event.

No permits will be issued outside of this time limit.

 

PERMITS AND LICENSES
 
EXPIRATION DATE
 
ANNUAL FEE
 
RETAIL FOOD APP (total square footage includes storage)      
  • (under 2,500 sq. ft.)             
June 30 $150.00
  • (2,500-15,000 sq. ft.)                        
June 30 $200.00
  • (0ver 15,000 sq. ft.)
June 30 $300.00
FOOD SERVICE ESTABLISHMENT APP(under 25 seats) June 30 $150.00
(25-100 seats) June 30 $200.00
(101-200 seats)  June 30 $250.00
(Over 200 seats) June 30 $300.00
MOBILE FOOD June 30 $100.00
RESIDENTIAL KITCHENS June 30 $50.00
Temporary Food (per event) valid for 14 days $50.00
Catering Establishment June 30 $100.00
BAKERY APPL    
  • (Full Bakery-retail)
June 30 $150.00
  • (Limited Bakery-non-retail)
June 30 $50.00
FROZEN TREAT APPL June 30 $100.00
Carbonated Beverage/Bottled Water    
  • City
June 30 $37.50
  • State
June 30 $37.50
Tobacco June 30 $100.00

Tobacco Regulations – e-cigarettes
Tobacco Regulations – persons under 21
Tobacco Regulations – Public Places

   
DUMPSTER APPL June 30 $20.00
Burial Permits* as needed $10.00
Funeral Directors* April 30 $50.00
MANICURING APPL Dec. 31 $100.00
Tanning Dec. 31 $50.00
Body Art    
Dec. 31 $300.00
Dec. 31 $150.00
Poultry farms/Barns & Stables* Dec. 31 $50.00
SWIMMING POOL APPL Dec 31 $100.00
HOTEL APPL    
  • (0-50 rooms)
Dec. 31 $100.00
  • (51-100 rooms)
Dec. 31 $200.00
  • (over 100 rooms)
Dec. 31 $300.00
Recreation Camps Dec. 31 $75.00
Transport/Removal of garbage/offal/sewage/Offensive*    
  • (1-10 vehicles)
Dec. 31 $50.00
  • (11-20 vehicles)
Dec. 31 $20.00
  • (21 and over vehicles)
Dec. 31 $10.00
Septic System Installer/Contractor                  Dec. 31 $100.00
Disposal System Construction 3 years from date of issue  $50.00
Percolation Test (witnessing of test)* as needed $100.00
Private Drinking Well Water* No expiration $100.00
Subdivision Plans* No expiration $100.00
MA Rent Voucher Inspection (MRVP)/per unit 1 yr. from date of issue           $75.00
Inspection and Occupancy Fee/per unit as needed $75.00
Vacant Building Registration as needed See PDF

*Apply at Board of Health

ALL FEES PAID ARE NON-REFUNDABLE
NO PERMITS WILL BE ISSUED IF TAXES ARE OWED

   

 

Welcome! We do far more than caring for lost and abandoned animals in our community. 
 

It is the goal of the City of Holyoke’s Animal Control Department to provide responsive, effective and courteous animal care and control assistance to residents and animals of Holyoke. Through the professional operation of the Animal Control Program and an animal care and control center. These services include but are not limited to:

 

  • Licensing Information – Dog licenses are available through the City Clerk’s office
  • Adoptions – We are pleased to partner with The Thomas J O’Connor Animal Control and Adoption Center, check their site to view current pets available for adoption as well as upcoming events. Also, be sure to visit their Facebook page!
  • What to do if your animal is missing or has been impounded- Call 413-781-1485 and/or visit the Animal Care Center, located at 627 Cottage St Springfield, to verify if your pet is already there.
  • Lost and Found Services – We will assist you and spread the word to surrounding communities to also be aware of your missing pet. We also urge patrons to call the local Police Department or Animal Control Department in your city/town to advise them of your missing pet.

 

 If you need immediate assistance or have an animal related emergency outside of normal business hours, please call the Thomas J. O’Connor Animal Control Department at 413-781-1485 or the Holyoke Police Department at 413-322-6900

 

We in the City of Holyoke believe education is key. It is no different when it comes to your beloved pets. Providing valuable information, such as for missing pets, those available for adoption and other helpful links can be found at the following:

 

 

Please visit our Frequently asked questions page to find information about animal complaints, wildlife, emergency preparedness and MORE!

Code Inspectors oversee code enforcement activities related to sanitarian, food, environmental, human habitation, air pollution, hazardous waste, etc. They perform inspections and enforce all chapters of the State and Sanitary Code, the State and Environemntal Code, and various other applicable State Regulations, State Statues, and City Ordinances.

 

Our Inspectors:

John Wierciszewski, Senior Code Inspector
Juana Massa, Code Inspector

 

Massachusetts Department of Health Code of Massachusetts regulations (CMR)

105 CMR: Department of Public Health

 

To report a violation please call us at: (413) 322-5955

 

The Board of Health Provides the following inspection services

  • Complaints
  • Inspections Under State Sanitary Codes
  • Lead Determinations/CLPPP
  • Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program MRVP-Owner Request Inspections
    Visit the State of Massachusetts web site for detailed information about this program.

We at the Board of Health know how important it is to stay current with your training, development and certification.
 

This is why we team up with reputable organizations to offer you high quality programming that fits your schedule, budget, and gives you the certification that you need. From workshops to online classes, here is the place to check out the current schedules.
 

Take a look at what we have to offer:
 

ServSafe Program 


NEW COURSE

ServSafe Examination Session
This is an opportunity to re-test, re-certify or take the exam for the first time to get certified
June 7th at 9:00 am at the Hatfield Fire Department, 59 Main Street, Hatfield, MA
               9:00 am – 10:00 am Review Session
               10:00 am – 12:00 pm Test
               $ 100.00 for Re-Test or Re-Certification
               $ 150.00 First Time Certification
If you are interested please contact Merridith O’Leary, R.S., by June 3, 2016 at moleary@northamptonma.gov


SERVSAFE CERTIFICATION

Wheelwright Consultants

Rehabilitative Resources, Inc.

Eastern Food Safety

Western Massachusetts Public Health Association

Morrell Associates

 SAFETY MANAGER COURSE

 BODY ART SKIN COURSE

 

The Holyoke Mass in Motion program, Healthy Holyoke, funded by a Community Transformation Grant from the Centers for Disease Control and administered by MDPH is housed within the Health Department. Designed to combat obesity and associated chronic diseases by promoting healthy eating and active living, Healthy Holyoke is implementing systems and policy change across five program areas: Safe Routes to Schools, Complete Streets, Farmers Markets, School Nutrition and Healthy Markets (Corner Stores.)

 

A major emphasis of the program in Holyoke is to increase access to healthy food options and fresh fruit and vegetables within a clinical setting (Holyoke Health Center), in the schools, at the City’s farmers market, and in corner stores or bodegas.

 

 

Welcome City of Holyoke Employees!

 

The Workplace Wellness program is here for you with the goal to create a healthy community among the City of Holyoke employees. Through programs and events, Workplace Wellness will provide support, education, encouragement, and the opportunity to improve the quality of individual and family lives.

 

What is Workplace Wellness?

Workplace Wellness is designed as a program to promote healthy behaviors in and out of the work environment in order to combat health conditions affecting Holyoke such as obesity, hypertension, and tobacco use. Improving employee health is not only a way to be a happier and healthier employee; it can help lower City health insurance rates and your overall health care costs.

 

How did Workplace Wellness come to Holyoke?

Holyoke was one of 9 communities to receive a Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund (PWTF) award in the fall of 2014 for four years. The Trust Fund was established by the MA legislature through Ch. 224 to reduce the rates of the most prevalent and preventable health conditions disease, increase healthy behaviors, address health disparities and reduce health care costs. The Trust Fund is administered by the Department of Public Health (DPH).

 

What can Workplace Wellness offer me?

 There is a variety of opportunities and programming for all City employees:

CURRENT EVENTS

Sitting back and enjoying the warm breeze of the ocean gives us time to calm our mind and regroup our thoughts. Spending time with family and friends often goes by too quickly. Take time to enjoy the summer but please be aware of these concerns when taking care of yourself and your family.

WATER SAFETY: A reminder to take steps to prevent water-related injuries, supervise children at all times and keep YOUR distractions to a minimum. After the children are done swimming secure the pool so they cannot get back in. Remove floats, balls and other items from the pools so children are not tempted to reach for them. Parents and family members are encouraged to take a CPR COURSE.

HEAT ILLNESS: Heat cramps, heat exhaustion, heat stroke can occur after vigorous activities like running or being outside in the heat too long. Prevention is the key. Avoid direct sun from morning until 4 p.m.; limit vigorous exercise or chores to early morning or late afternoon. Dress in light colored, loose fitting clothes. Avoid caffeine or alcohol. Eat light meals. Prevent over-heating and rest indoors with a fan or air conditioning. If outdoors rest in a shady spot and apply cool cloths to your skin for comfort. Most importantly, drink plenty of water!

PETS: A reminder from Erick, our Animal Control Officer, to not leave animals/pets in your car during these hot months. Even those animals left outside need to have shade and cool water available.

SCHOOL PHYSICALS AND VACCINATIONS: A reminder to all parents with school-aged children; now is the time to be preparing to make appointments for your child’s school physical and or vaccinations. Don’t forget to get a copy of all physicals and immunizations to give to the school nurse in the fall.

VISIT YOUR DENTIST: Not to be left out are dental appointments before school begins. This is one of the best times to get cleanings done before the hectic schedule of sports or after-school activities begins.

This month’s July Health News continues to focus on mosquito bite and tick bite prevention. Also of concern is proper food handling and storage. This information was address in my June news letter but it is so important that it is repeated this month and is found at the end of this newsletter.

SUMMERTIME HEALTH NEWS
Summer and the months that we have all been waiting for, but with summer brings a new set of health concerns. We find ourselves outside day and night and trying to take in as much warm outdoors as our bodies can handle. As a reminder to prevent our bodies from dehydration be sure to drink plenty of water and less caffeine and limit the amount of sugarry drinks that you consume. Also, limit your exposure to the sun and always wear sun screen and reapply after swimming. For those people with asthma, be aware of your “triggers” and try to stay indoors with air conditioning in use when the air quality is poor outside.

MOSQUITO BORNE-ILLNESS
Mosquitioes can carry many diseases and here in the North East we are not without our concerns.
West Nile Virus: is transmitted between birds and mosquitoes then transmitted to humans/mammals by infected mosquitoes. It is characterized by a fever, headache, tiredness, rash and individuals feel like they have the “flu” for approximately 30 days.
Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE): is passed on to horses and humans by infected mosquitoes. It is one of the most serious mosquito-borne viruses because it can affect the central nervous system.
Zika Virus: Although no locally acquired cases reported in Massachusetts, to-date there have been a total of 591 travel reported cases in the United States.
The best protection against mosquitoes is the use of insect repellent, wear long sleeve clothing, avoid activities outside from dusk to dawn, repair screens in your home and remove standing water in and around your home.

TICK BORNE-DISEASES
Ticks are generally found in brushy or wooded areas, near the ground, they cannot jump or fly. They will transfer to your skin or clothes as you brush directly against them. There are several tick-borne diseases here within Massachusetts. One in particular is Lyme Disease.
Lyme Disease : Surfaced in the 1970’s when a group of children and adults in Lyme Connecticut and surrounding areas came down with health issues that included swollen knees, paralysis, skin rash ( bulls-eye), headache and severe chronic fatigue symptoms. After much research the link to all these symptoms was the deer tick. The tick spreads this bacteria/disease by biting humans and animals. Lyme Disease is not transmitted from human to human. There are approximately 329,000 cases a year. This disease is reportable to the Mass Dept. of Public Health and Centers for Disease Control.
Protection from getting bit by ticks includes wearing long sleeved shirts, long pants tucked in your socks and shoes especially when walking in grassy or wooded areas. It is advised that you wear light colored clothing for better visibility to recognize a tick on your clothing.

TICK REMOVAL
To remove a tick from your skin the best method is to pull it out with tweezers as close to the skin as possible. Remember that the longer the tick is attached to you the risk of infection increases, however the tick must be attached to your skin for at least two days to transmit Lyme bacteria. Diagnosis is made by a doctor after listening to your history, symptoms and physical findings as well as blood tests. Treatment for Lyme Disease usually includes antibiotics. Always seek medical advice if you experience and of these signs or symptoms.

Please remember to check your pets for ticks after they have been outside. Unfortunately, they can also get infected with Lyme Disease. Talk to your veterinarian about prevention.

FIRE UP THE BBQ
From the Store: Home First
When you are shopping, buy cold food like meat and poultry last, right before checkout. Separate raw meat and poultry from other food in your shopping cart. To guard against cross-contamination — which can happen when raw meat or poultry juices drip on other food — put packages of raw meat and poultry into plastic bags.
Plan to drive directly home from the grocery store. You may want to take a cooler with ice for perishables. Always refrigerate perishable food within 2 hours. Refrigerate within 1 hour when the temperature is above 90 °F.
At home, place meat and poultry in the refrigerator immediately. Freeze poultry and ground meat that won’t be used in 1 or 2 days; freeze other meat within 4 to 5 days.
Transporting
When you are carrying food to another location, keep it cold to minimize bacterial growth. Use an insulated cooler with sufficient ice or ice packs to keep the food at 40 °F or below. Pack food right from the refrigerator into the cooler immediately before leaving home.
Keep Cold Food Cold
Keep meat and poultry refrigerated until ready to use. Only take out the meat and poultry that will immediately be placed on the grill.
When using a cooler, keep it out of the direct sun by placing it in the shade or shelter. Avoid opening the lid too often, which lets cold air out and warm air in. Pack beverages in one cooler and perishables in a separate cooler.
Keep Everything Clean
Be sure there are plenty of clean utensils and platters. To prevent food-borne illness, don’t use the same platter and utensils for raw and cooked meat and poultry. Harmful bacteria present in raw meat and
poultry and their juices can contaminate safely cooked food.
If you’re eating away from home, find out if there’s a source of clean water. If not, bring water for preparation and cleaning. Or pack clean cloths, and moist towelettes for cleaning surfaces and hands.
Cook Thoroughly
Cook food to a safe minimum internal temperature to destroy harmful bacteria. Meat and poultry cooked on a grill often browns very fast on the outside. Use a food thermometer to be sure the food has reached a safe minimum internal temperature.

MEATS
Cook all raw beef, pork, lamb and veal steaks, chops, and roasts to a minimum internal temperature of 145 °F as measured with a food thermometer before removing meat from the heat source. For safety and quality, allow meat to rest for at least three minutes before carving or consuming. For reasons of personal preference, consumers may choose to cook meat to higher temperatures.
GROUND MEATS
Cook all raw ground beef, pork, lamb, and veal to an internal temperature of 160 °F as measured with a food thermometer.
POULTRY
Cook all poultry to a safe minimum internal temperature of 165 °F as measured with a food thermometer.
*****NEVER partially grill meat or poultry and finish cooking later.
Keep Hot Food Hot
After cooking meat and poultry on the grill, keep it hot until served — at 140 °F or warmer.
Keep cooked meats hot by setting them to the side of the grill rack, not directly over the coals where they could overcook. At home, the cooked meat can be kept hot in an oven set at approximately 200 °F, in a chafing dish or slow cooker, or on a warming tray.
Serving the Food
When taking food off the grill, use a clean platter. Don’t put cooked food on the same platter that held raw meat or poultry. Any harmful bacteria present in the raw meat juices could contaminate safely cooked food.

******In hot weather (above 90 °F), food should never sit out for more than 1 hour.
Leftovers
Refrigerate any leftovers promptly in shallow containers. Discard any food left out more than 2 hours (1 hour if temperatures are above 90 °F).
Website: www.usda.gov

 

Tuberculosis Skin Testing

Tuberculin Skin Testing will now be offered at the Holyoke Board of Health. We are located in City Hall Annex, 20 Korean Veterans Plaza.

SKIN TESTING WILL BE DONE BY APPOINTMENTS ONLY!

The fee is $10. You can make an appointment by calling the Public Health Nurse at (413) 322-5598. Please be aware that once this test is administered, you will need to return to the Board of Health to have the skin test read 48-72 hours later.

 

Department Head

Brian Fitzgerald

Brian Fitzgerald

Director

Office Address

City Hall Annex
Room 306
20 Korean Veterans Plaza
Holyoke MA 01040 Map

Contact Info

Main Office

(413) 322-5595

(413) 322-5596 (fax)

boh@holyoke.org

Office Hours

Monday - Friday
8:30 am - 4:30 pm

Share This Page

Posted on December 3, 2012 by